Posts Tagged ‘roof garden’

Elegant East Village Roof Garden

Looking for inspiration? Check out this New York City roof garden on Remodelista. This custom built fountain — created to serve as a bench too — is my favorite part.

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How To Start A Simple Roof Garden

Roof gardens can quickly become complex and expensive. Some people will talk about irrigation systems, fancy furniture, changes to the roof structure, plus plants. Start simple, I say. Make sure your roof can support the weight. Then put some containers up there. (And like you see in this photo – splurge on a sturdy, large umbrella!)

Many new roof gardeners are hunting for advice on how to start. This short article could be a great starting place for your roof garden.

image: Sunset Magazine

Flavor Paper’s Modern Meadow

I usually think of wild, dense plantings as looking oldy-worldy, but check out this punchy modern Brooklyn roof garden.  This garden is part of Flavor Paper’s new live-work space. Head to New York magazine for more (via Apartment Therapy).

David and Esme’s Bushwick Roof Garden

Fest your eyes on Esme and David’s amazing Bushwick, Brooklyn roof garden and visit their Flickr page to get the full tour. This is their first year as roof gardeners.

They live on the top floor of their building and run a hose up from their kitchen sink to water.  They use self-watering containers and built a wind barrier with plastic trellises from home depot and some pallets scavenged from a warehouse. This tall red flower is a Mexican Sunflower.

They are experimenting with a small part of the roof area, since the landlord is concerned about the weight and water damage. They are hoping to get more space to grow next summer.

Here’s the very ambitious list of all they are growing up there:
Moonflowers
Morning Glories
Black-eyed Susans
Teddy Bear Sunflowers
Mexican Sunflowers
Eggplant
Strawberries
Corn (Esme reports: “not looking so hot – it was our most ambitious crop!”)
Tomatoes
Cucumbers
Serrano Peppers
Thyme, Basil, Oregano, Parsley, dill
Nasturtiums

I can’t wait to learn more about how the sunflowers are doing. I never even dared attempt growing them. And our rooftop moonvine met an early death, so I’m interested to hear how they are keeping them happy too.

Photos: Esme and David

Tips On Buying An Apartment With Outdor Space

They New York Times tell us: “For those who want their own place in the sun, apartments with private patios, terraces, balconies and roof decks are to be found all over the city. But the supply is, like summer itself, on the short side, and brokers say that buyers should expect to pay a premium.” For advice on what it takes to get illusive outdoor space, read the full article.

Here’s the listing for this one bedroom with a roof garden in Chelsea.

Images: NY Times (top), Corcoran (lower)

Loll Designs Sale @ Gilt Home

We’d love to upgrade our roof garden furniture. We’d swap out the plastic Adirondacks a la Target to these beauties from Loll. They are on sale until tomorrow night at Gilt Home: $365, marked down from $520. Loll’s outdoor garden furniture is made in the USA from 100% recycled plastic.

Trying to Save Our Sempervivum: Succulent Garden

There were amazing sempervivums and sedums at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden plant sale. I decided I could create one a succulent dish gardens inspired by a Deborah Lee Baldwin’s new book: Succulent Container Gardens.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have any of the other items I needed when I bought the plants.  It took me two weeks to get a  low terra cotta bowl, fast-draining succulent potting soil, and a bag of little rocks.

I went to put the stunning Sempervivum ‘Baronesse’ (hens and chicks), grown by Glover Perennials in Cutchogue, NY,  into the pot and I saw a few little flies and smelled rot. Oh no! This perfect plant with cobweb rosettes and red highlights was rotting from underneath! It was too wet and not getting enough light. I feel guilty for not being a better parent to these perfect plants.

I removed the rotting leaves, popped it in the pot with some spindly sedum (also in need of more hot sun!) and placed it a sunny and isolated spot on our roof. I don’t want the few flies to spread to my other pots! I hope a few days baking in the sun can nurse this plant back. I’d like to use it as the centerpiece for the patio table on our roof garden.