Posts Tagged ‘shopping’

Two Places To Buy Pots and Containers

We’re looking for a few new containers to spice up our collection. I love the selection at Jayson Home and Garden in Chicago. Take a look. I’ve visited Jayson Home and Garden twice on trips to Chicago and pushed mail order from them as well. I highly recommend them.

A friend from Apartment Therapy also suggested that I check out Pottery Manufacturing, though they may be more of a trade resource?

Do you have a favorite place to buy your pots in Brooklyn, NYC and beyond? Please comment and share your resources!

Image: Jayson Home and Garden

Adding three shrubs to our roof garden

We went to Chelsea Garden Center in Red Hook, Brooklyn this afternoon. Our mission was to pick out two or three small trees. R* wanted the shrubs to give our little roof garden height and definition, plus a sense of seperation.

$170 plus cabs later, we ended up with two Emerald Green Arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis ‘Emerald’) grown by East Coast Nurseries and a holly (Ilex meserveae ‘Blue Maid’). We had great help at Chelsea Garden Center. We picked these small trees because they can handle full sun and are somewhat drought tolerant once established. Also, I found a drought tolerant Heuchera called Dolce Blackcurrant at Chelsea and I couldn’t help adding two pots to our order.

I loved this holly, but it was over a hundred bucks. We set our sights on a less posh plant. Since we weren’t sure how these plants would do on our particular roof — even with the assurance of the gardener working with us — we weren’t ready to invest in any one tree.

Earlier this morning, we’d picked up red geraniums, mini white petunias, fiber optic grass and marigolds at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket.

Use CB2’s maze to create a simple green wall

We love the cover of the new CB2 catalog. Since when are guys shown gardening on the cover of a national catalog? Isn’t it cool how they use this metal maze wall hanging thing as a way to create a simple green wall effect, using air plants and succulents. We like the CB2 Julep rocker in this photo too.

There’s a step by guide on how to make this green wall on the CB2 site.

Images: CB2

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Plant Sale — Coming in May!

We’re looking forward to loading up our roof garden with plants from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden plant sale on May 5 and 6. Last summer we hauled in plants from all over Brooklyn and Manhattan . . .  but the Brooklyn Botanic Garden is only a few blocks from our apartment so this will be great. In the Garden on LoHud.com has all the details. This will be our first sale, so R* and I are really looking forward to it.

“Dedicated to helping local urbanites improve their gardens while making the city greener, the two-day Plant Sale offers both indoor and outdoor plants, including a vast selection of perennials, shrubs, trees, and vines; herbs and vegetables, including heirloom varieties; exotic tropicals; native plants; hanging baskets; orchids; “collector’s corners” of rare and unusual annuals; and much more.”

Brooklyn Botanic Garden members are invited to a Members-Only Preview Sale will be held on Tuesday, May 4, from 4:30 to 8 p.m.

Check out the Flatbush Gardener for a look at last year’s sale.

Image: FlatbushGardener

Lee Valley Sale, or Why I Bought a $72 Watering Can

hawswateringcan

Lee Valley is running free shipping sale through this weekend. Good thing too — our nasty neighbor has decided that we cannot use the hose on the roof anymore, so we ordered another large Haws’ watering can.

Without access to the hose, we’ve been making double and triple trips down to our apartment to fill up our watering cans and take them too the roof. I like to think that this is keeping us fit and making sure we don’t waste a drop of water.

Now $72 is a lot to pay for a watering can!! But when you’re taking two trips up and down three flights of stairs trying not to splash water on the co-op carpet, you might as well treat yourself. We’ve also found that the rose — aka watering can nozzle — helps to direct water to our containers, where as the plastic Home Depot cans drip and spill. Plus we’re starting to fall for the romance of hardworking, beautiful British gardening tools.

We’ll let you know if we’ve completely lost it or if the $72 Haws fetches water 10 times better than the $7 Home Depot plastic job.

Want to see where the Haws obsession started and learn more about their company? Here’s my first post about Haws.